Naughty By Nature: Wanda Orme’s Latest Series “Fever Tree” Praises Mother Earth (NSFW)

Wanda Orme is the rare breed of creative whose every touch seems to turn to gold. The artist, photographer, model, and renaissance woman is known for crafting work that surges with soul, boldly engaging the world around her with intuition, vulnerability, and a free-spirited energy that is downright infectious. Steeped in sensation and radiating an often scorching sensuality, her art speaks to the quiet power of openness, celebrating the multi-faceted divinity of the female form. Her latest series, “Fever Tree” is a dreamy deep dive exploring the relationship between nature and womanhood, the inherent sensuality and unapologetic naturalness that they share.

Awash in kaleidoscopic colors and buttery tones that evoke the 1970’s, “Fever Tree” features collages of women that feel pulled from the pages of pin up magazines, lounging languidly with flowers and plants superimposed where their faces should be. The result is thrilling, in more ways than one. Viewed in this context, perched atop naked bodies, the blossoms and blooms evoke a lifelike feminine energy that verges on erotic – you notice the soft curl of silky petals, the sun-dappled patterns, the veiny ridges of leaves, the delicate boldness of these living, breathing things.

By bringing flowers and plants to the forefront and placing them literally at eye level, Orme is reminding the viewer that we ourselves are an extension of nature, pulsing with the same dynamic fusion of vulnerability and strength. But “Fever Tree” is more than just a feast for the eyes. Orme’s collages could also be interpreted as a comment about the naturalness of nakedness, proposing that the nude female form is no different from a voluptuous flower in full bloom, except for the way that we decide to see it – nakedness is natural and objectification is not.

It’s also intriguing to note that the flowers are covering the women’s faces while their bodies are bared unapologetically, which turns our society’s rigid notion of censorship on its head, laying nudity and nature side by side and questioning why one is inappropriate and one is beautiful. There is a playful yet unabashed sense of empowerment infused in these collages, a frank openness coupled with an acknowledgement of the fight to be protected and respected.

Orme describes the series as “a continuation of my work exploring ideas of surplus excess and bloom, sexuality and censorship, anonymity and intimacy. In a world where the female body is seen to present a challenge in its unchecked form, these images present a playful challenge to perception – a chimerical image, the unacceptable rambling and fundamentally challenging analogue difference of nature.”

An exploration into the tangled relationship between nature and nurture, these seemingly simple collages evoke a nuanced reaction, as with everything Orme does. Most of all, they serve as a powerful testament to the intricate connection between women and the Earth, what they tolerate and what they share, how both find a way to blossom no matter their surroundings or circumstances.

L’Agent Goodies…