Art Crush: Mark Rubenstein’s “Gone By Dawn”

In “Gone By Dawn,” a photographic body of work spanning 13 years, Mark Rubenstein introduces his muses; beautiful ingenues caught in a transitional period between the vulnerability of childhood and the power of their future self. The images are moody and surreal, reflecting the shaky, yet exhilarating feeling of being “not a girl, not yet a woman.” The book (limited edition of 100, signed & numbered) has just been released at Colette in Paris and although it hasn’t had its Los Angeles debut, Rubenstein’s already way deep into his next journey. Enjoy our interview and peep all these babes!

Q&A

LF: What is the “Gone By Dawn” project? 

MR: “Gone By Dawn” is the culmination of the progression of my work for the last 13 years. All my work is narrative based, and in that sense I create works that are in the form of chapters. This latest chapter of work has taken me two years to complete.

LF: Describe your creative process…

MR: The process of creating these images is audacious and extremely time consuming. They are created using film, they are highly constructed and serve a very specific purpose. Casting the people and creating the perfect space for my images involves a highly detailed process of location scouting and specificity. I want to create the most true and earnest image I can, I put my all in these images.

LF: How did you select your subjects? What makes you tick

MR: Most of the subjects I have used throughout the years have been close friends. Together we create a dialogue with each other; it all comes together in the form of the photoshoot that day. What makes me tick is the reflection of life and the experiences that I have. I channel my entire self into the work, producing images out of the utmost sincerity.

LF: How did you develop such a fascination with the passing of time and the transformation from childhood to adulthood?

MR: I  have had a very eventful life. Like most people you would talk to, I have faced my own hardships and demons. Our lives as humans beings are very strange. Since I was young I have always felt a self-awareness and connection to everything around me. I have always had a difficult time of turning this off. I reflect on everything around me, I experience a nostalgia for past and a hope for the future. The process of transitioning from childhood to adulthood captures the essence of what I choose to say about our time on this world. The crafting of ones-self as an individual is a remarkable thing. How circumstance and experience shapes us as a whole. My images are created to reflect these ideas.

LF: Does this series gives a emotional insight into the essence of womanhood?

MR: The subjects I use in my work serve a very specific purpose. Im using these woman as conduit for my own self reflection. This work in no means addresses the essence of womanhood but women embody what I’m portraying at this point in my life. They are able to capacitate and project a sense of understanding that is beyond reach of most men.

LF:  How do you feel upon releasing a body of work you have been curating and perfecting for over a decade?

MR: The journey in creating these images has been arduous and a true test of one’s dedication to making personal work. After a decade of constantly working at my craft it feels pretty amazing to be able to put this out there. I am proud to stay I have not compromised my esthetic along the road of contemporary trends in photography.

LF: What’s next?

MR: I am in the process of putting together a book release party in Los Angeles. Beyond that, I have begun shooting for my next body of work, it will continue the themes I have been exploring on a much larger scale. Specifically using large outdoors environments and situations.

LF: How do you feel about turning 30?

MR: I did not think I would survive this long, in all honesty. Before I left NYC I passed out on the train. I fell face forward through the exit doors and received a concussion. My body was dragged away by the train. Ive had a lot of close calls like that.

LF: How fast do you live?

MR: Getting dragged away by trains and running from cops, I’d say pretty fast.

It’s All Gucci…