Interview Series: Neave Bozorgi (NSFW)

Neave Bozorgi’s rise into L.A.’s photography royalty, a feat that he accomplished in only two short years, is nothing but astonishing. He has compiled an extensive body of work in this time, capturing moments of intimacy and sensual exploits. His favorite subject, as he says – legs, always and forever – reveal themselves as dominant features in many of his photographs, and he toys with the nudity often without a glimpse of the face, making the viewer hone in on the lines and curves of the body.

He’s also not afraid to show himself reflecting in a mirror which is refreshing in an “it is what it is” kind of way. He’s there to photograph beautiful women, in camera (a.k.a. with as little Photoshop as possible), and it’s the real deal.

Q&A

LF: What’s the most important thing you’ve learned in the past / first two years of your career as a photographer?

NB: I’d say to go against the grain. In the beginning I was all about creating images that were trendy. From the clothes to the post work, I was that new kid that was trying to fit. Then one day I said “fuck that” and started to do my own thing. I also learned that I have the best excuse to play out my fantasies through photography.

LF: How did you get started with photography?

NB: I used to post a blog about two and a half years ago. It was just a collection of photos that I had gathered from around the Internet. So around the beginning of 2011 I decided that photography seemed fun and that I’d give it a try. So I grabbed an old digital camera my friend had given me and began shooting friends and girls around school. I had no idea what I was doing, but they were decent enough photos that people started to become interested. I did my first official shoot July 14th of 2011. I had a full “team” for it, that’s why I consider it my official shoot. I worked a miserable 9 to 5 at a jewelry line during that time and around December of that same year I decided to quit and pursue photography as a freelancer. Looking back now it was a reckless move, but I’m glad I did it.

LF: Do you remember the first subject(s) you became obsessed with taking pictures of?

NB: Legs. Always and forever.

LF: Flash forward to this day… What makes you tick, what makes you click?

NB: To leave a dent, a legacy. It’s this sense of urgency. I don’t really know how to explain it but its just an urge to fuck shit up. Every time I shoot I’m thinking “How can I make this one better than the last shoot? How do I shoot the subject like no one else has before?” It’s all about making a lasting impression.

LF: What are the main ingredients in a good photograph?

NB: It’s not something I can verbalize. I feel like when people try to approach photography from a technical point of view, they start sacrificing the soul of it. There’s no formula, at least for me. Just don’t be cheesy and obvious. Oh and the less photoshop the better.

LF: In the day to day, who catches your eye?

NB: People with confidence who are good at what they do, and are humble about it. Girls with nice legs. Aggressive Prius drivers. You go!

LF: What’s your favorite period in art history, and how does it affect your work?

NB: I can’t think of a specific era, but I have always been drawn to art that shows the separation of classes. I’ve always liked photos and works of art that show people in sort of a “out of reach” setting. And I try to do that with my own photos. Create this fantasy world where it seems out of reach.

As far as influence on my photography I would say Nina Leen, Irving Penn, Helmut Netwon, Juergen Teller, Ellen Von Unwerth. What all these photographers have in common is that they create a world where every day people don’t get to live, and that’s something I try to create in my work as well.

LF: How do you see the future of blogs / fashion blogs developing?

NB: New ones are going to keep popping up constantly. Most of them are going to post the same shit and will be void of any activity within the first year. It takes hard work to make a blog an authority website, and I feel like a lot of people lack the commitment and the patience to keep going at it.

LF: How important is sexuality in your vision and in your body of work?

NB: It’s important, but it’s not all of it. But then again it depends on how we’re defining sexuality in a photo. Some think a girl walking in the middle of a road, with her mouth open and her finger touching her lips is sexual. And then some, like me, think a girl who exudes power and confidence is sexual.

LF: What’s your biggest photographer’s fantasy?

NB: To do a nude shoot with a gorgeous flight attendant during a flight…

LF: What’s the sexiest thing a woman’s ever said to you?

NB: “Don’t pull over. I’ll just get on top of you while you drive.”

LF: If you could give girls one piece of dating advice, what would it be?

NB: Don’t take too many selfies. It’s a turn off.

LF: Where do you want to take your career? What is the next step for you?

NB: I’m thinking going more towards shooting advertising would be the way for me. I’ve never been too interested in shooting for magazine, unless they’re a big name. I’m more into creating iconic images that last, so I think that would be a good direction. Only if I get to shoot them my way though, I’m not into that overly photoshopped studio bullshit.

Next step would be to team up with some awesome wardrobe stylists and execute some ideas I have for photographs, and from there finish putting together a coffee table book…

LF: How fast do you live?

NB: 88 mph.


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